How to Fire a Caregiver

Discover how to fire a caregiver with confidence and professionalism. Navigate the process smoothly and protect your rights.

Terminating a Caregiver: A Guide

When the relationship between a caregiver and their client becomes untenable, it may be necessary to terminate the caregiver's employment. This section provides a guide to help navigate the process of terminating a caregiver, including understanding corrective action and recognizing signs of an incompatible caregiver.

Understanding Corrective Action

Before resorting to termination, it is important to consider corrective action as an initial step. Corrective action aims to address and resolve employee performance problems in order to retain the caregiver as a productive staff member. This process should be approached as a positive collaboration between the supervisor and the caregiver, with the goal of achieving necessary improvements rather than implementing punitive measures.

Through corrective action, specific concerns can be addressed, expectations can be clarified, and support can be provided to help the caregiver succeed in their role. By engaging in open and honest communication, you may be able to resolve issues and salvage the working relationship.

Signs of an Incompatible Caregiver

Recognizing the signs of an incompatible caregiver is crucial in determining whether it's time to make a change. While each situation is unique, there are common indicators that may suggest a caregiver is not the right fit for you or your loved one. Some signs to look out for include:

  1. Lack of empathy: A caregiver should demonstrate empathy and compassion towards their clients. If you consistently observe a lack of empathy or a dismissive attitude, it may indicate an incompatibility.
  2. Neglect or indifference: If you notice signs of neglect, such as missed medications or lack of attention to personal care, it may be a warning sign that the caregiver is not performing their duties adequately.
  3. Inconsistent performance: Caregivers should consistently demonstrate professionalism and reliability. Frequent lateness, missed shifts, or inconsistent quality of care can be indicators of an incompatible caregiver.
  4. Poor communication: Effective communication is essential in the caregiver-client relationship. If the caregiver consistently fails to communicate important information or disregards your concerns, it may be indicative of a larger issue.
  5. Violation of boundaries: Caregivers should respect personal boundaries and maintain professional behavior. If you experience repeated violations of boundaries or discomfort in their presence, it may be a sign that the caregiver is not a good fit.
  6. Unresolved conflicts: If conflicts or disputes arise and cannot be resolved through open and respectful communication, it may indicate a fundamental incompatibility between the caregiver and client.

Recognizing these signs can help you evaluate whether the caregiver's performance is aligned with your expectations and needs. If any of these indicators persist despite attempts to address them, it may be time to consider terminating the caregiver's employment.

Understanding corrective action and recognizing signs of an incompatible caregiver are important steps in navigating the process of terminating a caregiver. By following a thoughtful and respectful approach, you can make informed decisions to ensure the well-being and quality of care for yourself or your loved one.

Reasons for Firing a Caregiver

When it becomes necessary to terminate the employment of a caregiver, there are several valid reasons that may warrant such action. It is important to ensure that the decision to fire a caregiver is based on legitimate concerns and supported by documented evidence. Two common reasons for terminating a caregiver's employment include poor performance and misconduct, as well as breach of contract and neglect.

Poor Performance and Misconduct

Poor performance and misconduct are valid grounds for dismissing a caregiver. It is essential to recognize the signs of poor performance, which may include consistently failing to meet job expectations, neglecting assigned duties, or providing substandard care. In such cases, corrective action should be taken before considering termination. Corrective action, as suggested by the University of Washington Human Resources, aims to resolve and improve employee performance.

Misconduct, on the other hand, refers to behavior that violates workplace rules or professional standards. Examples of misconduct may include theft, dishonesty, abuse, or inappropriate behavior towards the care recipient or other staff members. It is crucial to thoroughly investigate allegations of misconduct and ensure that any disciplinary action taken is fair and justified.

Breach of Contract and Neglect

Breach of contract and neglect are serious concerns that may warrant the termination of a caregiver's employment. Caregivers are typically hired under an employment contract that outlines their responsibilities and obligations. If a caregiver consistently fails to fulfill these contractual obligations, it may be necessary to terminate their employment.

Neglect, which involves the failure to provide adequate care and attention to the individual under their supervision, is another valid reason for termination. Neglect can manifest in various ways, such as ignoring medical needs, not following prescribed care plans, or showing a lack of concern for the well-being of the care recipient.

Recognizing the signs of an incompatible caregiver, as mentioned by Nautilus Senior Home Care, is crucial in determining when it may be necessary to take action. It is important to assess the caregiver's performance, adherence to professional standards, and commitment to fulfilling their duties to ensure the best possible care for the individual in need.

When faced with these situations, it is crucial to follow proper procedures, including documentation and legal compliance, to ensure a fair and justifiable termination process. This protects the rights of both the caregiver and the employer, as outlined by CNESST.

In the next sections, we will explore the steps involved in preparing for and conducting the termination process, as well as the legal considerations and professional approaches that should be taken into account when firing a caregiver.

Preparing to Fire a Caregiver

Before taking any steps to terminate a caregiver, it is essential to go through a proper preparation process. This involves reviewing the employment contract and providing proper notice to the caregiver.

Reviewing the Employment Contract

One of the first steps in preparing to fire a caregiver is to thoroughly review the employment contract that you have with them. The employment contract outlines the terms and conditions of the employment relationship, including provisions related to termination. It is crucial to carefully read through the contract and familiarize yourself with the agreed-upon terms. By doing so, you ensure that you are following the proper procedures and adhering to the obligations outlined in the contract. Reviewing the employment contract helps to ensure that you are well-informed about the specific conditions and requirements surrounding the termination process.

Providing Proper Notice

Once you have reviewed the employment contract and made the decision to terminate the caregiver, it is important to provide proper notice as required by the contract or local employment laws. The notice period typically depends on the terms outlined in the contract or the applicable labor laws in your jurisdiction. Providing proper notice is not only a legal obligation but also a respectful and fair practice that allows the caregiver to make necessary arrangements for their future employment or personal situation.

The notice period serves as a transition period, during which you can discuss the termination with the caregiver, address any concerns, and ensure a smooth transition for both parties involved. It is important to consult the employment contract and any applicable labor laws to determine the appropriate notice period. By providing proper notice, you demonstrate professionalism and uphold the rights of the caregiver.

Reviewing the employment contract and providing proper notice are crucial steps in the process of firing a caregiver. These steps help ensure that you navigate the termination process in a legally compliant and respectful manner. By being prepared and following the appropriate procedures, you can effectively manage the termination process and minimize any potential conflicts or misunderstandings.

The Process of Firing a Caregiver

When it becomes necessary to terminate a caregiver, it's essential to follow a structured process to ensure clear communication, legal compliance, and support for the caregiver. This section will guide you through the steps involved in the process of firing a caregiver: direct and clear communication, documentation and legal compliance, and providing support and resources for the caregiver.

Direct and Clear Communication

When communicating the decision to fire a caregiver, it's important to be direct and clear in your communication. Clearly and calmly express the reasons for the decision, referring to specific incidents or concerns that have led to this point. It is crucial to use "I" statements to convey your perspective without sounding accusatory. This helps to maintain a respectful and dignified conversation [2]. Additionally, encourage the caregiver to share their perspective and concerns, fostering open dialogue and allowing them to express themselves.

Documentation and Legal Compliance

A structured approach to firing a caregiver involves following company protocols and ensuring that the termination aligns with relevant laws and regulations. Documentation plays a crucial role in this process. It is essential to thoroughly document everything, including performance issues, discussions, warnings, and reasons for termination. Clear documentation can protect the employer in case of legal action or unemployment claims. By maintaining a record of the caregiver's performance and behavior, you can demonstrate the justifications for the decision, if necessary.

It is important to review the employment contract and any relevant policies to ensure that the termination is in compliance with the terms outlined. Adhering to legal requirements regarding notice periods, final payments, and benefits is crucial to avoid any potential legal implications. By following proper legal procedures, you can protect the rights of both the caregiver and the employer.

Support and Resources for the Caregiver

Prior to firing a caregiver, it is recommended to have a support system in place for the individual being terminated. This demonstrates empathy and helps to ease the transition for the caregiver. Providing resources or assistance can help them find new job opportunities or access necessary support services. This can include offering information about job placement agencies or providing guidance on updating their resume and preparing for interviews. By offering support and resources, you show that you value their well-being even during a difficult situation [3].

Remember, firing a caregiver is a sensitive process that requires clear communication, documentation, and compliance with legal obligations. By following these steps and offering support where possible, you can navigate the process with professionalism and respect.

Handling the Termination

When it comes to terminating a caregiver, it's important to handle the process with care and professionalism. This section will outline three key aspects of handling the termination: conducting a face-to-face meeting, ensuring safety and security, and managing document retrieval and confidentiality.

Conducting a Face-to-Face Meeting

When terminating a caregiver, it is recommended to have a face-to-face meeting with the individual. Choose a neutral location where both parties can comfortably discuss the termination. This setting helps maintain a professional atmosphere and allows for open communication.

During the meeting, clearly communicate the reasons for the termination in a respectful and dignified manner. It is essential to ensure that the caregiver understands why the decision was made and what led to their termination. Provide a written letter outlining the reasons for termination as well, so there is no confusion or misunderstanding. Having another individual present during the meeting can provide support and serve as a witness.

Ensuring Safety and Security

Prior to the termination meeting, consider the safety and security of both parties involved. If there are any concerns about the caregiver's reaction or potential conflicts, it may be necessary to have additional support or security measures in place. This could involve having another person present during the meeting or alerting appropriate authorities if there is a potential risk.

Additionally, ensure that all personal belongings of the caregiver are collected and returned to them in a safe and organized manner. This includes any keys, access cards, or other items that may belong to the caregiver.

Document Retrieval and Confidentiality

After terminating a caregiver, it is important to handle the situation with sensitivity and professionalism. Provide the caregiver with any necessary paperwork related to their termination, such as a termination letter or final paycheck. Clearly explain the next steps regarding benefits, if applicable, and any other relevant information.

Maintain confidentiality throughout the process. Respect the caregiver's privacy by keeping their personal information confidential and securely storing any relevant documentation. This helps protect their rights and ensures compliance with privacy regulations.

By conducting a face-to-face meeting, prioritizing safety and security, and handling document retrieval and confidentiality with care, you can navigate the termination process in a professional and respectful manner. Remember to always approach the situation with empathy and provide the necessary support to help the caregiver transition to their next steps.

Legal Considerations for Caregiver Termination

When it comes to terminating a caregiver, employers need to be aware of the legal considerations to ensure they comply with the relevant guidelines and protect the rights of both parties involved. This section will discuss employer obligations and CNESST guidelines, as well as the importance of protecting rights and avoiding penalties.

Employer Obligations and CNESST Guidelines

The Quebec Labor Standards Commission, also known as CNESST, provides guidelines and regulations that employers must follow when terminating an employee, including caregivers. According to CNESST, employers have the right to terminate an employee for various reasons, such as incompetence, the occurrence of a prohibited act, or inconsistency with the operation of the enterprise.

When it comes to terminating a caregiver, employers should ensure they have valid reasons for the termination. This may include the caregiver's inability to perform their duties or their unsuitability for the job, as long as it aligns with the guidelines set forth by CNESST.

Protecting Rights and Avoiding Penalties

Employers must be cautious when terminating a caregiver to avoid penalties and legal consequences. It is essential to provide the caregiver with proper notice or compensation in lieu of notice, which should be based on the duration of their employment. This notice period grants the caregiver time to find alternative employment and ensures a fair transition.

If an employer dismisses a caregiver without a valid reason or fails to follow the correct termination procedures outlined by CNESST, they may face penalties imposed by the commission. It is crucial to adhere to the guidelines to protect both the caregiver's rights and the employer's legal standing.

Caregivers, like any other employees, have protections under the Quebec Labor Standards Commission to ensure fair treatment by their employers. These protections safeguard against wrongful termination and provide a framework for resolving disputes or conflicts that may arise during the termination process [4].

By understanding and following the employer obligations and CNESST guidelines, employers can navigate the termination process for caregivers in a lawful and respectful manner. This not only protects the rights of the caregiver but also helps employers avoid potential penalties and legal complications.

Professional Termination of a Caregiver

When it becomes necessary to terminate a caregiver's employment, it's important to handle the process professionally and with respect for all parties involved. This section explores the key aspects of professionally terminating a caregiver, including gathering documentation and evaluations, respectful communication and dignity, and addressing logistical concerns and final payments.

Gathering Documentation and Evaluations

Before proceeding with the termination, it's crucial to gather all relevant documentation regarding the caregiver's performance, behavior, and any incidents or concerns that have led to the decision. Thorough documentation can provide a clear record of the caregiver's performance issues and serve as evidence in case of legal action or unemployment claims.

Additionally, evaluations and performance reviews can contribute to the documentation process. These evaluations should be objective and based on specific criteria, highlighting areas of improvement and any ongoing issues that have not been resolved. Including these evaluations in the documentation can further support the decision to terminate the caregiver's employment.

Respectful Communication and Dignity

When communicating the decision to fire a caregiver, it's vital to approach the conversation with respect and dignity. Choose an appropriate time and place for the discussion, ensuring privacy and minimal interruptions. Be direct and clear in your communication, calmly expressing the reasons for the decision without sounding accusatory. Referring to specific incidents or concerns can help provide clarity and understanding. It's essential to allow the caregiver to share their perspective as well, fostering open dialogue and maintaining mutual respect.

Throughout the termination process, it's important to treat the caregiver with dignity and compassion. Avoid personal comments or conflicts, keeping the focus on the business aspects of the termination. By maintaining professionalism, you can help minimize potential emotional distress for both parties involved.

Logistical Concerns and Final Payments

As part of the termination process, it's important to address logistical concerns and ensure a smooth transition. This includes retrieving any company property, keys, or documents that the caregiver may have in their possession. By promptly collecting these items, you can prevent complications or unauthorized access after termination.

Final payments, such as wages, should be processed in accordance with applicable employment laws and regulations. Ensure that all outstanding payments, including any accrued vacation or sick leave, are calculated correctly. By providing the caregiver with their final payments in a timely manner, you demonstrate professionalism and adherence to legal obligations.

By handling the termination of a caregiver professionally, you can navigate the process with respect and dignity. Gathering documentation and evaluations, maintaining respectful communication, and addressing logistical concerns and final payments are essential aspects of a professional caregiver termination. Remember to comply with any legal obligations and maintain appropriate confidentiality throughout the process to ensure a smooth transition for all parties involved.

Hiring a Private Caregiver Responsibly

When considering hiring a private caregiver, it is crucial to approach the process responsibly to ensure legal compliance and workplace safety. As the employer, you have certain obligations and responsibilities to protect the caregiver's rights and adhere to legal requirements.

Legal Requirements and Compliance

Hiring a private caregiver "under the table" is illegal and can lead to significant fines. In Canada, illegally hiring a paid position can result in fines up to $25,000, in addition to penalties for not remitting payroll taxes and employer contributions to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). It is essential to follow the proper legal procedures when employing a caregiver to protect both parties involved.

As an employer of a private caregiver, you are responsible for remitting deductions to Revenue Canada monthly. This includes issuing Records of Employment, T4 statements, and meeting other requirements of formal employers. It's important to note that these deductions contribute to a 22% increase in hourly wages due to deductions.

Workplace Safety and Rights Protection

As the employer of a private caregiver, you have a responsibility to provide a safe work environment and protect the caregiver's rights. This includes adhering to the Employment Standards and Occupational Health and Safety Acts. It is crucial to ensure that work hours, breaks, holiday and vacation pay, and other rights are safeguarded within the caregiver's work environment. By prioritizing workplace safety and rights protection, you create a positive and fair working environment that benefits both you and the caregiver [6].

Before hiring a private caregiver, it is essential to verify that they have their insurance, malpractice policy, and bond for the repayment of damaged household items. As the employer, you are also responsible for ensuring coverage under the province's Workplace Safety Insurance in case of any injuries that may occur while on the job. By taking these precautions, you protect both the caregiver and yourself from potential liabilities.

When hiring a private caregiver, it is crucial to remember that you become the employer. Failing to have a formal employment arrangement puts you at risk. Responsibilities include registration with the CRA, ensuring an employment agreement, personnel forms, CPP contributions, vacation pay, statutory holiday pay, and EI contributions. Failure to comply with these requirements can result in fines. By following the proper legal procedures, you can ensure a transparent and legally compliant employment arrangement with your private caregiver [6].

By hiring a private caregiver responsibly and adhering to legal requirements, you create a safe and secure working environment for both yourself and the caregiver. Prioritizing legal compliance and workplace safety ensures a positive caregiver-employer relationship and provides peace of mind for all parties involved.

Legal Documents for Caregiving Arrangements

When it comes to caregiving arrangements, it is crucial to have the necessary legal documents in place to ensure clarity and protection for all parties involved. Two important legal documents to consider are the Power of Attorney and Advance Directives, as well as the importance of having a Will.

Power of Attorney and Advance Directives

A Power of Attorney (POA) is a legal document that allows an individual, known as the principal, to appoint an agent to carry out financial and other activities on their behalf. There are different types of POAs, including financial and medical POAs.

  • A financial Power of Attorney permits the appointed agent to handle financial matters, such as managing bank accounts, paying bills, and making financial decisions. This document can be effective immediately or in the event of illness or disability. It is advisable to have the document notarized, although it may not require witnesses.
  • A medical Power of Attorney, also known as a healthcare proxy or durable power of attorney for healthcare, allows the principal to designate an agent to make healthcare decisions on their behalf when they are unable to do so. This document grants the agent the authority to make all medical decisions, including treatment options and end-of-life care. It typically requires two witnesses and does not need to be notarized.

Another important document is the Advance Directive, which includes a Living Will and a Directive to Physicians, Family, or Surrogate. These documents outline an individual's wishes regarding medical treatment in the event they become unable to communicate their preferences.

  • A Living Will, also known as a Directive to Physicians, Family, or Surrogate, is an advance directive that instructs physicians to withhold life-sustaining procedures in cases of irreversible conditions or terminal illness. It allows individuals to specify the type of care they want to receive when they are unable to make decisions. This document generally requires two witnesses but does not need to be notarized.
  • A Medical Power of Attorney, as mentioned earlier, is broader than a Living Will and permits the designated agent to make all medical decisions on behalf of the individual. It is advisable to have both a Living Will and a Medical Power of Attorney to ensure comprehensive coverage of medical decisions and preferences.

Importance of Having a Will

In addition to the above documents, having a Will is crucial for caregiving arrangements. A Will is a legal document that specifies how an individual's assets and estate should be distributed after their passing. It ensures that their wishes are followed and can help prevent disputes among family members.

If an individual passes away without a Will, the distribution of their property will be determined by state law. Having a Will allows individuals to have control over the distribution of their assets, including personal belongings, real estate, and financial accounts. It is important to note that a Will must be signed by the testator, who must be of sound mind, and witnessed by at least two persons aged fourteen or older.

By having these legal documents in place, caregivers and their loved ones can ensure that their wishes are respected, and their best interests are protected. It is recommended to consult with an attorney specializing in estate planning and elder law to ensure the proper creation and execution of these documents.

Effective Communication with a Caregiver

When it becomes necessary to address issues with a caregiver's performance or behavior, effective communication is key. Open dialogue and addressing concerns in a clear and respectful manner can help maintain a healthy working relationship. It's important to recognize the need for change and approach the conversation with empathy and understanding.

Open Dialogue and Addressing Issues

Maintaining open lines of communication with your caregiver is crucial to fostering a positive work environment. Regularly check in with them to discuss any concerns, challenges, or changes in expectations. Encourage them to express their thoughts and feelings about their role and the care they provide. This open dialogue allows both parties to address any issues promptly and find mutually agreeable solutions.

When addressing concerns, it's important to be specific about the problem at hand. Provide examples of problematic behavior or performance and explain how it impacts the quality of care being provided. Use factual and non-judgmental language to avoid causing unnecessary offense or defensiveness. Remember to actively listen to your caregiver's perspective and be open to their input. This can help foster a collaborative approach to finding resolutions.

Recognizing the Need for Change

Sometimes, despite efforts to address concerns, it becomes clear that the caregiver is not the right fit for your needs or the needs of your loved one. It's important to recognize when it's time to make a change. This decision should be based on a thorough evaluation of the caregiver's performance and behavior, taking into account the impact on the overall well-being and safety of the care recipient.

Indicators of an incompatible caregiver may include poor performance, behavior that does not align with your expectations, lack of compatibility with you or your loved one, and concerns or red flags that arise during the caregiver's employment. It's important to trust your instincts and prioritize the well-being of your loved one.

When recognizing the need for a change, approach the situation with empathy and understanding. Communicate your concerns honestly and respectfully. Acknowledge the caregiver's efforts and contributions, but explain that a different approach or a new caregiver may be necessary to meet the care recipient's needs effectively.

Remember, terminating a caregiver's services is a sensitive process that should be handled with care and respect. It's essential to provide adequate notice, clearly explain the reasons for the decision, and offer assistance in finding a replacement. Seeking guidance from a legal advisor or professional human resources consultant can also be beneficial to ensure compliance with labor laws and regulations. By maintaining open communication and recognizing the need for change, you can navigate the process of terminating a caregiver's services with empathy and professionalism.

Making the Decision to Fire a Caregiver

When it becomes necessary to terminate the employment of a caregiver, careful consideration must be given to the evaluation of their performance and behavior. Documentation of concerns and incidents is crucial to ensure a fair and justified decision.

Evaluation of Performance and Behavior

Before taking the step to fire a caregiver, it's important to conduct a thorough evaluation of their performance and behavior. This evaluation should be based on objective criteria and evidence, rather than personal opinions or biases. Consider the following factors:

  1. Performance: Assess the caregiver's ability to fulfill their duties and responsibilities effectively. Evaluate their skills, knowledge, and competence in providing the necessary care and support. Consider factors such as punctuality, reliability, adherence to protocols, and quality of care provided.
  2. Professionalism: Evaluate the caregiver's conduct and professionalism in their interactions with you, your loved one, and other members of your household. Assess their communication skills, respectfulness, and ability to maintain appropriate boundaries.
  3. Compatibility: Consider whether the caregiver is a good fit for your specific needs and requirements. Evaluate whether they have the necessary skills, experience, and temperament to meet your expectations.

Documentation of Concerns and Incidents

Thorough documentation is essential when making the decision to fire a caregiver. Keep a record of any concerns or issues that have arisen during their employment. Document specific incidents, dates, and details of any performance or behavioral problems.

Include any warnings or corrective actions that have been taken in an attempt to address the issues. This documentation serves as a factual account of the caregiver's performance and behavior, providing a basis for the decision to terminate their employment.

By maintaining detailed records, you can demonstrate that the decision to fire the caregiver is not arbitrary or unjust. It also helps protect the employer in case of legal action or unemployment claims.

Remember, the objective of terminating a caregiver should be to ensure the well-being and safety of your loved one. By carefully evaluating their performance and behavior and documenting any concerns, you can make an informed decision that is fair and justifiable.

In the next section, we will discuss the process of firing a caregiver, including direct and clear communication, documentation requirements, and providing support and resources during this challenging time.

Firing a Caregiver: The Conversation

When it comes to terminating a caregiver, having a clear and respectful conversation is essential. This conversation should take place in a suitable environment, involve direct and clear communication, and encourage open dialogue.

Choosing the Right Time and Place

Selecting the appropriate time and place for the conversation is crucial in order to ensure privacy and minimize distractions. Find a quiet and private setting where both parties can discuss the matter without interruptions. This helps create a comfortable environment and allows for focused and open communication. It's important to schedule the conversation at a time when there are no immediate caregiving responsibilities or time constraints.

Direct and Clear Communication

When communicating the decision to terminate a caregiver, it is important to be direct and clear in your communication. Clearly and calmly express the reasons for the decision, referring to specific incidents or concerns that have led to this point. Use "I" statements to convey your perspective without sounding accusatory. By being straightforward and transparent, you can minimize misunderstandings and ensure that the caregiver fully understands the reasons behind the termination. It's also crucial to give the caregiver an opportunity to share their perspective and concerns during the conversation.

Encouraging Open Dialogue

During the conversation, it is essential to encourage open dialogue and active listening. Create a safe space where the caregiver feels comfortable expressing their thoughts and concerns. By actively listening to their perspective, you can gain a better understanding of their point of view and potentially address any misunderstandings. This open dialogue can also help alleviate some of the emotional tension and provide a more respectful and dignified termination process [2].

Remember, terminating a caregiver is a challenging and sensitive process. By choosing the right time and place, engaging in direct and clear communication, and encouraging open dialogue, you can approach the conversation in a respectful and professional manner.

References

[1]: https://hr.uw.edu/ops/performance-management/corrective-action/
[2]: https://www.nautilusshc.com/blog/how-to-fire-a-caregiver
[3]: https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/employee-performance-issues-documentation
[4]: https://www.cnesst.gouv.qc.ca/sites/default/files/documents/labour-standards-quebec.pdf
[5]: https://www.care.com/c/en-ca/12-steps-firing-caregiver/
[6]: https://www.rightathomecanada.com/resources/hiring-a-private-caregiver
[7]: https://familycaregiversonline.net/caregiver-education/legal-issues-for-caregivers/
[8]: https://caregiversolutions.ca/featured-carousel/employing-a-caregiver-its-a-two-way-street/